Center for Student Wellness & Counseling

Reporting Concerns
If you believe there may be imminent danger of harm to a student or someone else, contact University Police at 330.325.5911 or 911.

After-Hours Urgent Crisis
If you are experiencing an emotional or psychiatric crisis and are unable to reach a NEOMED counselor, please contact the Community Crisis Resources.

Help a Student

Help for students having personal or academic difficulties

Professional school can be a difficult and stressful time and while students can usually manage the multiple stressors of professional, academic and personal demands, it’s okay to ask for or offer help to those in distress or need of support.

For Faculty & Staff

Too much stress can catch up with any of us. Our students can usually manage the multiple stressors of professional, academic and personal demands, but when these demands become overwhelming, their normal ways of coping can become ineffective or non-existent, causing problems in overall functioning. As a faculty or staff member, you can make a difference.

Is it stress or distress?

By understanding the signs of distress, providing support in a critical moment and referring a distressed student to appropriate services, you can help to restore balance and put the student back on track.

It’s helpful to understand the differences between a person under stress, which is a normal reaction to difficulties in life, and a person in distress—a heightened reaction to stress that makes a person feel helpless and unable to function.

Stress
  • Unusual or exaggerated emotional response to events
  • Hyperactivity and/or rapid speech
  • Changes in academic performance
  • Repeated requests for special consideration (e.g. extensions for scheduled exams or to meet academic or University deadlines)
  • Depressed or lethargic mood
Distress
  • Suicidal statements (direct or indirect)
  • Extreme anxiety resulting in panic reactions
  • Written or verbal threats, or attempted homicide or assault
  • Highly disruptive behavior (e.g. hostility, aggression, violence)
  • Inability to communicate effectively (e.g. slurred speech, disjointed thoughts)

What can I do?

Immediate Danger

If you believe there is imminent danger of harm to the student or someone else, contact University Police at 330.325.5911 or 911.

Non-emergent

If you are concerned about a student but are uncertain about how to approach the situation, call the Center for Student Wellness & Counseling Services for a confidential consultation at 330.325.6757.

How can I help?

Showing that you care by talking with a student that is experiencing stress or distress can helpful. Here are some things to consider as you do so:

Ensure Privacy

Find a place that offers privacy and comfort so that the student can talk openly without fear of others hearing. Listening attentively may help the student feel less isolated and gain confidence in taking steps toward wellness.

Never Promise Confidentiality

You don’t know what a student will disclose to you and you don’t know if danger is imminent.

Be Factual, Respectful & Direct

Be specific. Express your concern and share your observations of the changes you have seen in them. For example, say, “I’ve noticed that you haven’t been your usual talkative self with others lately.”

Respond Thoughtfully

A student may react emotionally to the conversation. Remember that your empathetic approach may help them feel heard and validated in the conversation.

Refer

Familiarize yourself with the services that NEOMED provides on campus as well as through the community resources on the University’s website. Explain ways that help is available, and emphasize that seeking help is a sign of strength.

 

Follow Up

Following up is an important part of the process. Check with the student later to find out how they are doing, and provide support as appropriate.

For Students

A change in behavior of a friend, roommate or classmate can make us question what exactly they might be going through.

Signs to Look For

signs that someone might need help
  • A recent traumatic event or loss
  • Suicidal statements (direct or indirect)
  • Expressions of being unhappy or sadness
  • Negative statements or expressions of helplessness or hopelessness
  • Changes in energy level, sleep or appetite
  • Loss of interest in activities once enjoyed
  • Social withdrawal or isolation
  • Changes in personal hygiene or appearance
  • Signs of excessive alcohol and/or drug use
  • Relationship problems with family or friends or partner

How can I help?

  • Let them know that seeking counseling takes strength and that it may help provide support during a stressful or difficult time.
  • Let them know that counseling is free and confidential.
  • Listen and show empathy while talking to the person you are concerned about.
  • Offer to come to the first appointment as a means of support and belief that counseling may help.
  • If you’re not certain how to approach someone about seeking help, call the Center for Student Wellness & Counseling Services at 330.325.6757.
  • Familiarize yourself with the services that NEOMED provides on campus as well as through the community resources on the University’s website.

Make an Appointment or Contact

Phone: 330.325.6757
Email: counseling@neomed.edu

After Hours Crisis

Coleman Professional Services:
330.296.3555
National Crisis Hotline:
800.273.8255
Crisis Text Line:
741741

Center for Student Wellness & Counseling

Division of Health Affairs